matthen:

Another interesting property of the logarithmic spiral is revealed if you roll it along a horizontal line. This animation shows the curves traced by points on the spiral, and note that the very centre follows the path of a straight line. The angle between this line and the horizontal is called the pitch of the spiral, and for our spiral galaxy the pitch is around 12 degrees. [more] [code] 

matthen:

Another interesting property of the logarithmic spiral is revealed if you roll it along a horizontal line. This animation shows the curves traced by points on the spiral, and note that the very centre follows the path of a straight line. The angle between this line and the horizontal is called the pitch of the spiral, and for our spiral galaxy the pitch is around 12 degrees. [more] [code

jtotheizzoe:

Meet Ham, the first primate in space! He took off on a suborbital space flight on January 31, 1961, preceding the USSR’s Yuri Gagarin into space by two and a half months.
His name stands for Holloman Aerospace Medical center, the Air Force base where he completed his training and mission prep. Of course, he was far from the only animal trained for the space program on either side of the Iron Curtain. NASA has written up an extensive history of animal astronauts (not all of it good, I’m afraid).
Check out this super-interesting, and slightly uncomfortable, 1961 newsreel film about Ham: Trailblazer in Space.

Ham lived, presumably happily, until 1983, when he died at the National Zoo and North Carolina Zoo. His remains were buried at the International Space Hall of Fame to commemorate his service to manned space flight. Way to go, little man.

jtotheizzoe:

Meet Ham, the first primate in space! He took off on a suborbital space flight on January 31, 1961, preceding the USSR’s Yuri Gagarin into space by two and a half months.

His name stands for Holloman Aerospace Medical center, the Air Force base where he completed his training and mission prep. Of course, he was far from the only animal trained for the space program on either side of the Iron Curtain. NASA has written up an extensive history of animal astronauts (not all of it good, I’m afraid).

Check out this super-interesting, and slightly uncomfortable, 1961 newsreel film about Ham: Trailblazer in Space.

Ham lived, presumably happily, until 1983, when he died at the National Zoo and North Carolina Zoo. His remains were buried at the International Space Hall of Fame to commemorate his service to manned space flight. Way to go, little man.

NASA Captures Suspicious Light on Mars

imageimage

(via Metro UK)

Does this mystery white light, captured by Nasa’s Curiosity rover, suggest there’s life on Mars?

Conspiracy theorists have suggested a photo captured by Nasa’s Mars Curiosity rover could indicate an alien presence on the surface.

The image taken on the Red Planet on April 3 seems to show a bright light shining on the horizon.

Some people subsequently claimed the glimmer was from something or someone on the ground… (read more)

 

science-junkie:

underthevastblueseas:

Ocean acidification is sometimes called “climate change’s evil twin,” and for good reason: it’s a significant and harmful consequence of excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that we don’t see or feel because its effects are happening underwater. At least one-quarter of the carbon dioxide (CO2) released by burning coal, oil and gas doesn’t stay in the air, but instead dissolves into the ocean. Since the beginning of the industrial era, the ocean has absorbed some 525 billion tons of CO2 from the atmosphere, presently around 22 million tons per day.

At first, scientists thought that this might be a good thing because it leaves less carbon dioxide in the air to warm the planet. But in the past decade, they’ve realized that this slowed warming has come at the cost of changing the ocean’s chemistry. When carbon dioxide dissolves in seawater, the water becomes more acidic and the ocean’s pH (a measure of how acidic or basic the ocean is) drops. Even though the ocean is immense, enough carbon dioxide can have a major impact. In the past 200 years alone, ocean water has become 30 percent more acidic—faster than any known change in ocean chemistry in the last 50 million years.

Read More